Sunday, March 17, 2013

Change of Venue

Fritzie, our mascot. 


Dear Bad Art Patron,

It is with heavy heart that we must report that the Ohio Bad Art Museum has been run out of Ohio by members of the art establishment bourgeoisie who do not understand that Art can be, and often times is, bad. Very bad.  And there is nothing shameful in celebrating that aspect of the art.

These poor misbegotten fools insist that art is ART! and all art is good.

We find this outlook provincial.

If art is only allowed to make one feel and weep, then it is simply a two dimensional medium.  Where is the joy in the Gross Clinic, other than the irony of its name?

We disagree with this self aggrandizing, overtly serious, black clothed parvenus in ugly eye wear!

We felt that we had to flee and have fled to a more place more like us.

That said, The Executive Director and the Collection Curator have relocated to Baltimore, Maryland with the entire collection intact.

Having visited Divine's grave in Towson, Maryland (overlooking Macy's) we have prayed for guidance and believe that we may have found a home for the collection.

Rest assured that every piece in the Collection is crated and in safe holding.  We are looking for members of the New Board of Trustees.  But before we do anything it is vital that we find a new acronym.

We hope to relaunch on Tumblr this fall.

Charmingly yours,

The Executive Director. 


Samba in San Paolo



SAMBA IN SAN PAOLO  - Unknown.  ca. 1960.  Aggregate on board.  Trapped in a bright cloud of off-white, Senorita braves the confining unknown world around her, dressed in a tube of broads strips, sandals, beaded bag and umbrella, as she seeks a rogue beauty operator to fix her flat lifeless hair.

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Dragon Lady Adrift


Dragon Lady Adrift


M. Rini, Artist,

Acrylic on Canvas, 16X20

In a far off land, enveloped in intrigue, you enter a dark bar filled with unsavory characters. What you want is a cold beer. What you find is trouble, and its dressed in magenta silk. Her name unimportant, but her measurements (36-24-36) are. You look at her and then turn your head to look at the wheezing corpulent man in the opposite corner of the bar. She looks at the same man in the opposite corner while she is looking at you. The dreaded Dragon Lady, armed with her diabolical drifting eye, has you both right where she wants you. The question is, which of you is in her good eye, and which one will not live to see the sunrise come morning...

Special Note: DLA was obtained from the estate of a 92 year-old lady, this picture hung in her home for as long as any of her family members could remember. Several of them thought it could have been their Grandma as a young girl; they claimed that she had eyes in the back of her head.

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. This image has been watermarked for its protection.  As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will -- for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Tuesday, April 20, 2010


Elaine & Reggie


Helen V. Foster, Artist
Oil on Canvas 24"X37"
pre-1980

The color. The hues. The wind that blows the scarf beneath her chin. The luminescence that lights the buttons on her blouse like the main runway at O'Hare International. The large lemon-like Pee Wee Herman style chair. The hair do and dual lip color. The missing right arm. The vibrancy that is all present except in the emotion of the subject and the aloof nature her dog. 

It is all for naught: ennui is all that remains as conveyed in Eliane's drifting eye. Touche.

SPECIAL NOTE: There has been great debate in art circles as to the origins of Elaine & Reggie. The work has even caused some art scholars to ask is "Reggie" really "Elaine"?

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Saturday, April 17, 2010

Little Cigars


Little Cigars

Unknown, Artist

Acrylic on Canvas; 18"X24", Framed
Date Undocumented
Murialism

In this work, noted artist Unknown reminds us that even for young children, a cigar is just a cigar; but a good cigar is a smoke.

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.


Sunday, April 11, 2010

Fifi



Fifi

Marj Teague, Artist
Pastel on Paper 13"X17",  ca. 1975
Poodlism
West Virginia School of Pastels and Soft Prints

Noted animal portraitist Teague captures the playful angst of the beloved Fifi by placing the animal in a natural Mary Kay Cosmetics Pink environment.  This helps to remove all doubt as to the sex of the poodle. No doubt Fifi's realistic facial expression can be attributed to her tightly bound ribbons atop chicken breast sized ears. Fifi's human-like eyes convey sorrow similar to the Keane waif paintings popular with young girls in the late 1960's.

However it is the thoughtful framing of this item, resplendent in a silver baroque frame, complete with engraved plate reading "Fifi", that elevates this whimsical piece to bad art masterpiece.


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.


Wednesday, April 7, 2010

Caesar, If I Die Tomorrow: A Guatemalan Rhapsody


Caesar, If I Die Tomorrow: A Guatemalan Rhapsody  


D.S. (aka 'The Goddess') Mikell, Artist

(Oil on Stretched Canvas 30"X36") mid 1990's

Made possible through a generous gift of the Brow459 Foundation

Using Gauguin's palette, and Hanna/ Barbera's technique -- the artist blends the possible with the inevitable and adds the need for self defense on this recycled canvas . A faceless Madonna watches over the acne scarred central figure -- who holding an as of yet unpainted item in his poised hands -- while the sin of drink, the fury of natures smoldering volcano, and the very real threat of flying cooking utensils threaten to upset this central American utopia.

The title of the work, so named by the artist, remains a cryptic enigma in our own time.


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.




Wednesday, March 31, 2010

A message from Bamoo's Board of Trustees, March, 2010


At their March 2010 Board Meeting, the BAMOO  Trustees voted to officially thank each and everyone of you for your support over the previous month.  As evident in the picture, it brings such joy to them that you, our faithful in Bad Art, get so much from our art.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Eye See You


Eye See You
(Also known as Basket O' Kitty Kat)

Artist: Milano

Acrylic on Artist Board

Keaneism, Faux-Fauvist

2002


One of Milano’s earlier works of the avant-garde Faux-Fauvist style. The subject is Kitty Kat, which floats within the basket on a sea of calm waters.  The heavy lines of the cat basket, and the harsh pink background draw on the early 20th century works of Matisse and Derain. The brilliant blue of Kitty’s plaintive eyes an homage to the works Keane.  More subtle brush work outlining Kitty’s furry body, however, call to mind the Impressionist movement and the lack of cat limbs or defined body perhaps pay homage to Picasso or even Damian Hirst. The oversized head forces not only our perspective but also one over-riding question: What are you lookin’ at?


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.




Tuesday, March 23, 2010

The Buck Stops Here


The Buck Stops Here

R. Krause, Artist, 1980s

18" X 24", Acryllic on Artist Board, Framed

Animal Tribute Art

Deer are many things to many people.  Bambi comes to mind.  But deer have issues.  And yes, even deer are needy.  They like to be included in the fun.  They have feelings. It is why men are drawn to them. Its why men draw and paint them.  If its not the saucy flick of their tails, what then is it? In this work artist Krause captures the enigmatic smile, and come hither flirtatiousness that deer naturally have.  It's not an in your face smile, but something more mysterious, on par with the subtle wisp of the Mona Lisa.  The smile encourages you, as if to say "Go ahead.  Make my day," without understanding the ramifications of it eagerness to please you.

Stylistically Krause's painting boldly incorporates mountains which act as a collar to frame the buck.  Its wood-grained ears - one of them spud like in shape -  compliment its double chin.  Oh, deer, indeed.


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.




Thursday, March 18, 2010

Edna Saint Sinner Milady



Edna Saint Sinner Milady
Also known as The Errant Lamprey's Suction Disc

Unknown, Artist

16"X20", Acrylic on stretch canvas

Lady Cavalierism


The use of searing color, a concave face dominate this work by Unknown. Is that a hat on melady's head? A disjointed giant red lamprey's suction disc? A large red halo? Could this denote an angelic favor or an evil that resides within, radiating from her brain? Other questions arise: Is she being pelted with snowballs,  white oozing enzymatic frothy foam lubricant, or just being attacked by Tribbles? Her piercing brittle blue eyes dare the viewer to draw his or her own conclusion while deflecting attention from the one attribute that suggests she is not entirely human: at the end of her out-of-line forearm and humerus rests a three-fingered hand.            
~MKS/SJK/BGM

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Progress or Chaos?

Edith Chamberlain, 1965

Artist (Acrylic on Art Board 18"X14") , Framed in ash.

Conflictism, Youngstown School of Art

The age old conflict between the power of the bible and Freud's theory of rocket envy are presented in this work by Chamberlain -- attributed to the artists 'wonder' years. It is a global message that asks are our hands meant for prayer, or... are they capable of helping humanity to blast off? All the while a disembodied eye (possibly God, possibly the artist's father) spies through the key hole of contempt and damnation at the bravado of mankind and his misuse of the adage to 'know thyself' .

Progress or Chaos was found by a garbage can in Youngstown Ohio. It joined BAMOO in 1999 and is part of the BAMOO Permanent Collection.
 

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

From the BAMOO Sculpture Garden: Tea Pot & Sympathy


Tea Pot & Sympathy


Artist: W. Hughes, late 1990s

Ceramic: Weight 3 lbs / Height 8" / Irregular Shape

This vessel, an abstract "tea pot," impresses the Bad Art patron with its bold use of form but a complete lack of function.  Its design is believed to based something that Ayn Rand's Howard Rourke would create following a evening of tempestuous sex with Dominque Francone, so she would have something to break when the mood struck her after the stick turned blue.

NOTE:  Very few works of bad art shock and frighten BAMOO's Director of Visual Significance into silence as this one did. Stunned, the item was referred the to BAMOO's Visual Interpretation Committee which was left just as speechless by this "object d' art" by objecting to it. Heated discussions (at times conducted silently with frantic finger pointing accompanied with vivid facial expressions) over its confused execution.

Whatever it is, bad karma is at its essence.

Our donor, who wishes to remain anonymous, literally BUMPED into this work, breaking it inside an art gallery in Royal Oak, Michigan. She was required to pay for her misstep with a check for the unbelievably obscene amount of $280.90. The work was then "fixed" by the its creator and some some crazy glue.  BAMOO has the teapot and the receipt to prove it, making this the single most expensive donation to BAMOO.  Therefore, we offer our thanks for the donation, and our sympathy for paying for it.

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Grey Poupon You


Grey Poupon You

Artist: Unknown, 2007

16" X 20" Acrylic on Canvas

Linearism, Abstraction

Passionate linear brush strokes, combined with bold freeform use of color and metallics, attack the subject with a raw vengeance for a truth unsought and yet unfound. Has Madame been attacked at a hot dog stand by an angry patron? Or playing with the latest fad in in her quest for this illusion that we humans call beauty? What of her golden Hapsburg Jaw? The pyramidic neck? Her expansive, plaintive eyes, black as frying pans, do not communicate her thoughts. Instead, they act as place holders until something else can fill the empty void.

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Blonde, Red Head and Brunette; A Study In Orange


Blonde, Red Head and Brunette; A Study In Orange
(Also known as Adam, Eve and Lilith in Hell)

Mulligan, 16" X 20" inches.  Acrylic on Artists Board

Joined BAMOO in 2001

A brutal interpretation of the laws of beauty, and set upon a field of scorching vividness. Mulligan uses Blonde, Red Head and Brunette; A Study in Orange as an allegory of society's perception of our nice'n easy culture using an amorphous three-headed beast to tell its tale. Simple minded blonde's will always come first. Cunning redheads standout, no matter where they are at the moment.  And even calling those dullards with brown hair "Brunettes" does nothing to make them more attractive. 

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2004, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Friday, March 5, 2010

If You See a Monkey-Bear Upon the Leopard Skin, You Must Kill Him


If You See a Monkey-Bear Upon the Leopard Skin, You Must Kill Him


Artist: Snooks

Tempra on Paper (12"X16")

Singular Dimensionalism

A complex philosophy, distilled to a singular monosyllabic diatribe. Flattened without being silenced, the message is clearly audible to all but the hearing.

Joined BAMOO Collection 6-2000

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

The Hobo Examines His Doughnut


The Hobo Examines His Doughnut


Artist: Boola

Acrylic on Board (9"X12")

Ostracism

Boola's technique is the visual equivalent of iambic pentameter verse: Short on axiomatic details while stressing the relationship of man to morsel. Does the weary face ponder its impending rendezvous with the stale snack, or is the pain expression a direct result of the disjointed arm and misaligned hand?

Joined BAMOO Collection 8-2000


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Monday, March 1, 2010

Somewhere Over the Phallic Rainbow


Somewhere Over the Phallic Rainbow

Artist: Unknown

16"X20" Acrylic on stretched canvas

Dorian Iconoclasm School of Painting

The artist’s muted color palette creates a light, ethereal background to this classic Judy Garland pose. The girlish pink offsets the jarring presence of the rainbow, which is presented here with green as its outer layer and red as its inner. As this is backwards from the natural color order of a rainbow, it subtly reminds the viewer that beauty can be artifice, created to manipulate an emotional response. The rainbow also appears to take on a life of its own, attempting to peek around Ms. Garland’s head to position itself more centrally in the picture, but Judy is having none of it. Clearly, as the artist points out, it is Judy who is the true wonder while the rainbow is merely a metaphor for her accidential influence on the gay community.    ~MKS

If one drinks one too many Whiskey Sours, clicks their heels three times and says "It must be her" that true enough, one can almost feel Judy's presence.

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Friday, February 26, 2010

BAMOO's Board of Trustees, February 2010

At the BAMOO Board of Trustee's February Meeting, a motion was passed to thank each of you, our dear Bad Art patrons, for your support.  We hope you will join again for more bad art next month!

Thursday, February 25, 2010

I Got The Mime in Me


I Got The Mime in Me

A. Fishman, signed artist
Freshman Art -Section 7-6 (Acrylic on Canvas 16"X20")
ca. 1979
Clownism, Mimeism

Speaking the universal language of teen alienation, this work explores the duality of the personea. It asks "are we 'young adults' as the library reading selections tell us we are, or old mustached men in these formative years?"


Yet Fishman's work also speaks volumes to each who see it and experience its cathartic questioning: Are our performances in the "theatre of human pathos" that of mere mortals performing stationary tasks as mute players in a grander scheme? Or are we all - behind closed doors and free of the invisible boxes that constrict our daily lives - pariahs yearning to communicate what we are otherwise inarticulate to say?

 
Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity with the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2004, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Christee, The Clown


Christee, The Clown

Attributed to M. Cook

Acrylic on stretch canvas

ca. 1975

Clownism, Religious Art

Christee's message is not that the circus is a place for fun, or for terror, but that He Lives, and explained in Christee's eyes which proselytize the good word.  Also hidden on Christee's face are any number of other messages ("Church is good" "Eat Your Vegetables"), etcetera and so on.  Christee joins the pantheon of religious art (the Sisteine Chapel, and other works) to tell the story of faith to the faithless and to reaffirm the smug and the saved.

However the real controversy behind Christee is the change that artist M. Cook's signature on this work has been forged by a possuer.  As such, and until the artist identifies his/herself, the work will be considered one bathed as much in controversy as it is in the light of Gee-sus.

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Pennywise, But Pound Foolish


Pennywise, But Pound Foolish


L Kenny, Artist (Oil on Stretched Canvas 15"X11") ca. 1965

And what child wouldn't want to wake up to this each day, with its sunny background and vivid use of the color wheel?

But so soon enough, Junior (or Princess) will know the horror that begins as innocently as a day at the circus, only to have the myth of the circus clown, King of the Happy-go-Lucky Buffoons evolve into a dark and menacing specter intent on retribution. The most compelling feature is Kenny's use of a jack-o-lantern mouth which helps to project the angst of the moment.

After all, everyone loves clowns, RIGHT?

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Le Clown, Marcel


Le Clown, Marcel
Unknown, ca. 1970

Acrylic on Stretch Canvas

Abtsract Hitchcock-Clownism

With Marcel we see the clown as the French would say, who is la needie.  Not le clown as Jerry Lewis would be le clown.  For that would be Le Clown Jerry Lewis, and this is Le Clown, Marcel.  But Marcel is a needful thing and he must be saved by you, or we all will die a death of deaths.  Plaintiff in his desire, Marcel does not beg for you attenion, he commands it, against a background that makes this work as dizzying, yet improbable.  Yet here you are, and here is Marcel. Life is a funny thing, no?  We say "yes, quite."

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2000, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Monday, February 22, 2010

Clowns of Giverny


Clowns of Giverny


Artist: Monnet

Date: Undocumented

Oil on Canvas (16"X24")

Style: Big Top Attributionsm, Clownism

Faces of everyone's favorite, the clown.  These two, like the classic forms of tragedy and comedy, convey the two types of clowning - that of the happy-go-lucky performer on the left and that of the person who uses his make as a mask so that the world will never see him crying, on the right.  Laugh clown. Indeed; laugh.

Speculation places this work after the exhaustion of Claude Monet's water lily fad expressed in the master's more renown works, and well beyond the noted artists death. The brush strokes are unlike any documented within the catalog of his works. Stylistically, the facial make-up of the subjects displaces them from the artists continent of livelihood. Still, the signature -- sporting its superfluous "N"-- is nothing more then a thinly veiled attempt to mask the true identity of the artist by a thinly veiled direct association, leading BAMOO's staff art historians to attribute this to some other artist's famed starvation period.

While it is not the practice of the Bad Art Museum of Ohio to accept such a work unless there is documented proof that its starving artist actually starved in a garret while painting the work in question, BAMOO did accept this piece because of its symbolism of an artist struggling to overcome the demons at work on creative self.



Joined BAMOO Collection 8-2000


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

A Message from our Esteemed Director: IT'S CLOWN WEEK!

Because winter has taken it toll on our senses, and the cold dark nights have heighthened our senses of how alone we are at this time of the year, how sound travels on a cold dark night and sometimes our greatest fears seem only as far away as the closest dark room, BAMOO would like to bring some joy to your life by presenting nothing but images of those happy go lucky fellows who live to bring nothing but joy: CLOWNS!

Today through Friday, BAMOO is setting up its Big Top and Presenting:

After All: Everybody Loves Clowns, Right? 

Each day will bring a new Clown to set your mind aflame with ideas and thoughts!

So sit back and enjoy this special show, just for you!

Friday, February 19, 2010

Lesson Three: If we say its bad, its bad, period.

For this lesson, let us explore the concept that as a Bad Art aficionado, one finds a work of Bad Art not to be "bad", but in fact finds it good.  "That isn't bad - I' kinda of like it." is something that we often hear in the galleries of BAMOO's spacious museum.  What is one experiencing?

One is experiencing Bad Art with honest emotions - simply because something is "bad" does not mean that it is an offense to every set of eyes in the world.  There is no shame in loving Bad Art - we do it every day.

The shame, however is in thinking that because one loves a work of Bad Art that it is not bad, just misunderstood.  In this instance, the uneducated person who is not in tune with his or her honesty, feels That they have some sort of magical power within to redeem Bad Art into something legitimate.  This is a fallacy and one is mistaken if one thinks this.  One's taste is never as flawless as one thinks, unless one is objective and admits that in order to love that which is truly beautiful, one must also love that which is honestly bad.

To be honest with one's self is to admit that something can be deemed as "bad" and to love it as "bad" is a good thing.  One feel not guilty for loving bad art.  One only need feel guilty for loving that which is bland or mediocre, like Michael Bolton , or Wal-Mart, or even melba toast (unless it is a man in a dress performing ballads on stage as 'Melba Toast', "The Artiste Supreme!") - that is really an admission that one has settled for less, rather than more.

Sincerely,

The Esteemed Director

Thursday, February 18, 2010

My Love For You is Like An Etch-A-Sketch


My Love for You is Like an Etch-A-Sketch

Unknown, Artist (Acrylic on Plywood 20X30")

1990's - Franticism

Unknown explores the raw proto-realism of the 1990's in this ode to the root of bad art, the Etch-A-Sketch. While the nude form only occupies the far right of the picture, one wonders on what astral plane she floats while her nervous aura communicates a frantic energy wave into the vapor that is space.

"My Love for You is Like an Etch-A-Sketch" is an historic artifact in the world of Bad Art. Unknown's work was declared an instant masterpiece by the Esteemed Director of the mothership of Bad Art, the Musuem of Bad Art (MOBA) in Dedham, Massachusetts. The work led to the formation of AFBAM (The American Federation of Bad Art Museums) and an immediate agreement was reached, the painting shipped to Dedham where it became part of MOBA's art show of nudes in a greater Boston healthclub.
 
Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the original works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Forest For the Trees




Trees for the Forest


Artist: Jennifer Connolly

Tempera on Watercolor Stock (16"X24")

Brutalism, Kindergardenism

Stickly trees, scorched by winter's cold, capture puffy storm clouds within their tendril-like branches seeking to express the interlocking relationships of earth to sky (and sky to earth) while the childlike representationalism explores the meaning of these contextual relationships.  In doing so, they demand that they will not be ignored, even by shapeshifting watervapor.

Making this work even more compelling is that the artist has chosen a simple medium which has been cleverly employed on paper stock not usually used in this style.  Deeper explanations merely obfuscate the primitive forms, and their actions, rendering those explanations pithy and hyperbolized.

Joined the BAMOO Collection 7-2000

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Leg Stretch Girl


Leg Stretch Girl


Artist: Tonya
Watercolor on Paper (9"X12")

Exorcism

Spindly spider-like legs - one raised in triumph and restrained by a Fettuccine strap, with the other leg is left lying like an unused snapped appendage sacrificed in the name of Yoga purity, and hair volumized to imply activity, - mark the dominant features this Goya-esque homage to what was hoped would be the Cosmo-girl for the 1980s.

Joined BAMOO Collection 8-2000


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Sunday, February 14, 2010

Happy Valentines Day From BAMOO


Lavender Behind


Artist: Jan   Acrylic on Board (16"X20")  Romantic Tones of Lavender Accented in Black

Tri-Saphoism / Lesbianism - Rococco

Lavender Behind Artist "Jan" relies upon the subtle trinity of monochromic hues, repetitive shapes and a portion of the human form, to achieve the pure bad art goal of objectifying the object. Hearts randomly abound like Birkenstocks in a Michigan field during August; their meaning a metaphor for the rampant and unspoken desire that dare not speak its name. Viva la Papillon d' Amour!

In an interesting and unwomynly turn of events, the artist signs her name inside a heart with the unabashed zeal usually seen high school students who dots their "i" with open circles; Too cute!

Joined BAMOO Collection 8-2000.  A gift from an anonymous dumster proximate to The Ohio State University

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.


We will return with more Bad Art on Febraury 16, 2010.

Friday, February 12, 2010

BAMOO - Wordled


What does BAMOO mean to you?

Have a great weekend.  See you Monday!

Lesson Two: Who decides if its bad?

In our last lesson we discussed how the Art Establishment isn't what it thinks that is.  With this matter cleared up, we'll discuss how art should be fun.

For far too long art has been a serious, serious affair. And we in the Bad Art movement believe that this seriousness has stifled an appreciation of art. As a result, people feel intimidated by art instead of "feeling" the art.

Art should illicit any number of reactions. And those reactions are honest as long as one allows themselves to react honestly. Now spitting at the Mona Lisa will get you arrested, but if it causes you to laugh aloud who is to say that this reaction is improper?

And so it is with Bad Art, which has been deemed such by a group of people who claim to be authorities in the matter. They have looked at a piece of art and they have reacted honestly to it and have called it bad for any number of reasons.

Earlier in the wee a work entitled Oodles the Three Legged Poodle debuted on this blog. It was certainly not the intent of the artist to paint a bad painting of Oodles. She probably went at it with the best of intentions, but something went horribly wrong, either in her perception or in her execution. What was clearly a piece of tribute art for a beloved pet is something altogether different in the end result. In the partitioning Oodles is pestered by two large blue balls, has a brassiere shaped patch of fur and three legs. The crowning glory is that Miller indicates through Oodles eyes that he is fearful of the those big blue balls.

So if Bad Art is defined as the best of intentions gone horribly wrong, shouldn't some good from it? If it brings a smile to your face, or makes you stop and consider all that is going on (or not going on) - if seeing this painting as Bad Art makes you appreciate it, then its not a failure - it is eliciting a response, and therefore it is a success.

Thus Bad Art frees you to look at a painting or sculpture and honestly say "its Bad Art and I'm not ashamed to say so."

Our next posting will be this coming Monday.

Yours in Bad Art,

The Esteemed Director, BAMOO

Thursday, February 11, 2010

Oodles the Three Legged Poodle





Oodles, the Three Legged Poodle

Ellen Miller, Artist (Oil on Canvas 24"X37") pre-1980


Animal Tribute School of Painting

Oodles represents all that vexes mankind. Paranoid and caught in the roulette wheel of life, artist Ellen Miller communicates that life is a crap shoot, and running is futile -- especially when one has three, not four legs, is blessed with a bra shaped patch of hair on ones chest and is at the same time tormented by giant blue balls.

Oodles, the Three Legged Poodle, Detail


Upon closer inspection, Oodles is vexed as his (or her) eyes convey.


Oodles, the Three Legged Poodle was one of several BAMOO works to receive international media recognition in 1999.


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print:  Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text, or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Wednesday, February 10, 2010


Owl Be Seeing Ya'


Artist: Matson, ca. 1960's Acrylic on Board (16"X20") Joined BAMOO Collection 1-2000

Trailerism School of Art

Conjoined owls cower hypnotically in the midst of an explosion of Halloween surrealism.

Matson's use of the color orange is so subtle yet needful that it literally sucks the rational thoughts out of one's head compelling one to take it home and hang it on the wall without really knowing why.

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print:  Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.




Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Still Life with Snoutless Dog

Still Life With Snoutless Dog


Unknown, Artist (Acrylic on Art Board; 20"X 16") ca. 1960 -- BAMOO Permanent Collection

This marks BAMOO's first official acquisition by the noted, and prolific artist, Unknown. 'Still Life with Snoutless Dog' was intended to be a study in relationships by the very nature of the ubiquitous planter, decanter and lap dog -- all of which are common everyday items found on table tops everywhere.  

Detail from 'Still Life with Snoutless Dog' ->


Details, such as the ones found in the ears, tail & rear thigh and facial cavity have helped to propel Still Life with Snoutless Dog to BAMOO's most talked about work of bad art.

Unknown's mastery of negative space -- offset by a festive dog collar -- in place of the familiar snout compels one to wonder what one would find inside the facial void.

Like all of Unknown's art, this work is unsigned, thus making it an authentic work by one of the most mysterious arts of our epoch.

BAMOO is pleased to point out that Still Life with Snoutless Dog received international acclaim in 1999 when it was compared to Robert Maplethrope's works by Cincinnati Enquirer columnist Laura Pulfer.  We are honored, as we know Mr. Maplethrope is was would have been as well at the comparision.

In honor of this honor "Fritzie" as he has been named, is the offical mascot of BAMOO.


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print:  Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2009, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Monday, February 8, 2010

Desire & Repulsion



Desire & Repulsion

Edna Martin, Artist (Oil on Board 21"X13")


Martin's work begs the question why does the fickle young Pollyanna anxiously attract that which she will discard and ultimately kill? The subject at once beckons one pigeon to alight on her finger while swatting a former love dove from her lap. One wonders if the dark bird to the right, which is left to bleed, is suffering the consequence of not being swift enough to escape? 

As disclosed on the back of this work, Artist Martin copied this work in a flat folk art style, painting from a 'Victorian' print, creating an incongruent work of intent versus outcome.

Note: This work was discovered outside a southern Ohio resale shop with a price of $10. While it is not the practice of BAMOO to pay such a high price for a work of this caliber, closer inspection of the tag indicated that the price was not for the art, but for the 'nice old frame'.

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print:  Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Friday, February 5, 2010

Lesson One: The Art Establishment

Today, after four works have been presented we instead focus on the theory behind Bad Art, and who decides what is and what is not, Bad Art.

By its very nature, the Art Establishment is not an actual establishment because organizing non-performing artists is a lot like herding cats, ergo, there can never be a true "art establishment".

As such those that form the art establishment are a bunch of self appointed elitists who exist to set the bar for what is good art, and what is everything else.  These people mock the average person on the street.  They look down their noses at the common man and woman on the street and pity them because they are certain that said people could never have the level of such exquisite tatse that they have convinced themselves that they have. 

And to these people, art is serious business.  Dreadfully serious.  So serious that art show openings have come to resemble calling hours at a funeral home, with everyone wearing black and pondering their own fate as they look at art that they may or may not like and wonder what the hell they are suppossed to be feeling at that moment.  If at a showing of a portraitists work, one will also hear the words most often heard in funeral homes: "He/She looks so life like."

But let's be honest with ourselves.  We've been to art shows and we've looked at the paintings and sculptures on display and we've said to our selves, under our breath, "I don't like it," and "It's not anything I would want in my house."  And then we just about have a heart attack when we discover that I Don't Like It is priced at more money than most of make in a year.

What these boring, and very bourgeois people forget is that art is in the eye of the beholder. 

The "Art Establishment" also don't understand that the man or woman on the street know what they like, and know what they feel is junk.   There are people out there who don't get Picasso, and never will because they think its a something Mexican that one pours over meat that gives them bad dreams at night.  To these people, a $50 starving artist paiting that goes with the davenport is more important than Jackson Pollack every did because everything that Pollack painted looks like the drop cloth after painting thier bathroom pink with purple polka dots.  And that's good enough for those people.  It may not be for you or I, but for them, thats just fine, because they have the right to love the things around them.  And you should be OK with that because it means you get to love the things that you love and think that Jackson Pollack is just fine if thats is your cup-o-tea.  But it also means that you get to look at piece of real honest to goodness art and say "Jesus! That's ugly!"  Its all good.

And if you are OK with that idea, that just drives the Art Establishment crazy.  And that is a very good thing - as this is the first step in truly be able to be honest about how art makes us feel.

So if they can do what they do, why can't we - Bad Art establishment do what we do: call them as we see them?

Our next posting of Bad Art will be this coming Monday.  Stay tuned!


Yours in Bad Art,

The Esteemed Director, BAMOO


NEXT WEEK: Who decides what bad, and why that's good.

Thursday, February 4, 2010

Ball By the Horns


Ball by the Horns


Undecipherable, Artist (Air Brush on Cotton Scrim 18"X24") ca. 1960's
A gift to BAMOO by the mother of the Esteemed  Director who discovered it in the Salvation Army Store in Marion, Ohio.

In this work, we are transported an empty arena to witness the raw energy of the fight, with the charging bull against the handsome matador, whose leg is erect and rigid.
However, while it may have been the intent of the artist to capture the raw emotion of the bullfight and the delicate moves such as the thrusting of the Bullfighter's hips, the artist instead exposed every bullfighters worst fear -- XYZ!

NOTE: Several bad art aficionados claim that this work also reveals another part of the male anatomy -- visible in the matador pant leg, see detail, below.



Ball by the Horns, DETAIL - Bad Art experts agree that while one can accidentally overindulge upon on a particular work of bad art in its creation, doing so with an air brush requires some skill and forethought, especially when elliptical, or "egg like" shapes are, shall we say, manifested?  What is the artist trying to tell us?

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print: Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Forever Umber

Forever Umber


Artist: Unknown, Oil on Canvas, 18X24

We see here, the prolific artist Unknown's attempt to address a pensive nude form...almost masculine in its shape, feminine in its hair style, and placed the figurine knee deep in a Freudian metaphore of umber paint laid thick, smattered and puckered, which lifts from the canvas to us as if to say "we are all mired in our own excretment, no?.  No, indeed.

Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print:  Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

Dear BAMOO,

Dear BAMOO,

We were visiting today and noticed the Notice of Copyright.  What does that mean?

Just sign me,

Curious in Fostoria

Dear Fostoria,

It is an unfortunate bit-o-business, but because BAMOO owns the works, we also own the rights to their use for use on products.  Therefore we have to put the wording in lest anyone - inlcuding a certain nation of many, many people who are notorious for copyright infringements  - decide that they want to open a Bad Art Museum of their own and try and use our works.  We doubt we would have a snow flakes chance in Aruba of winning any litigation, but we have to protect the integrity of our Bar Art and its use.

Yours in Bad Art,

The Esteemed Director, BAMOO

If you have questions regarding Bad Art, find our emial on this page and send us a note.  We'll consider the validity of your question, assign four or five Art History majors to it, and get back to you when we can!

Revenuers!


Revenuers!


Artist: Disputed (Acrylic on Art Board 16"X20")

Date: Undocumented

A clear discussion of Revenuers! can not begin until the controversy over its origins is settled. Evolutionists are convinced that work is of two artists, one building upon the weaker art of another. Creationists believe that work is clearly the creation of one artist who is attempting to convert their style from representational to abstract.

In 49 of the United States, this painting is viewed as a landscape with obtuse elements; In the state of Kansas, it is taught as the literal truth.


Bad Art Disclosure & Fine Print:  Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Monday, February 1, 2010

Can-Can Kabuki


Can Can Kabuki


V. Laszlo, Artist
(Acrylic on Art Board; 16" X 20")
ca. 1960
60sism School of Art
BAMOO Permanent Collection

The use of bold colors heightens the festive nature of this Eurasian melding of the traditionally reserved & conservative Kabuki art theatre form and the brash, no holds sexuality of Paris during the Fin de siecle . Laszlo imagines this strutting and saucy dancer in full Kabuki traditional make-up as evident in her ghostly white thigh. The dancer's face is fixated on an imagined audience member and conveys that as she raises her skirt, not for you, but for the wealthy Monsieur who will "come hither" her after the club closes that night.

CCK holds a special place in the Esteemed Directors heart - it was the first truly bad pieces we acquired way back in 1998.

Bad Art Disclosure Fine Print:  Believe it or not, all of the works featured in this web site are the property of BAMOO, a non-profit, non-asset, non-organization which controls their use, intended or otherwise. As such, any unauthorized use of our works, text or design by any person, organization or entity without the express written permission of BAMOO runs the risk of being contacted by our attorney --who really hates people who take things that aren't theirs or at least given to them. If you would like to use a part of this site, please contact BAMOO via email at obadartg@aol.com and allow us to review your intended use. Accessing any pages, works of bad art (or otherwise contained in this site) constitutes your acceptance of these terms -- something that we will point out to the courts in the unfortunate situation that we have to go after you -- and we will --for using our materials. That being said, copyright 2010, the Bad Art Museum of Ohio.

Sunday, January 31, 2010

The Rules of Bad Art

There are rules, established by our mothership, the Museum of Bad Art (MOBA) of Dedham, Massachusetts.  They are followed by all Muesum's accredited by AFBAM, of which we are members.  They go as such:

1) Works of Bad Art to be considered by AFBAM accredited museums must be original works of art by real people.  Chimpanzee art will not be considered for accession.

2) Works of Bad Art must deemed as Bad Art before they will be accepted.

3) AFBAM museums do not pay for Bad Art.

4) AFBAM museums may pay for Bad Art if the work is so beyond the realm of norm that its aquistion is imperative to protect the Bad Art form those who may harm the art.

5) AFBAM Museums may acquire, trade and sell Bad Art as they deem fit.

Thats about all there is to it.

Saturday, January 30, 2010

If we had sound, you'd be hearing it!


Something's coming....something good...

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

The Countdown Continues....

5 Days until Bad Art brightens your day and brings elitist joy to your life...

BAMOO Reopens on February 1, 2010.

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Watch this space

The Bad Art Muesum of Ohio, formerly known as the Ohio Bad Art Guild, is returning to the web via this blog on February 1, 2010

The Musuem's Board of Esteemed Trustees have emegered from their five year self imposed exile and decided to relauch the entire museum collection, consisting of over 100 works of original Bad Art (more or less), via this blog space.  As before, the Esteemed Trustees feel that all art, even those pieces that fail to make the BIG TIME, deserve their moment of glory.

Artists represented include several names, most of which you have never heard of, or may sound or look familiar if you are related to the artists.

What makes Bad Art bad?  More importantly, who decides why art is Bad Art?  And why is Bad Art capialized? ALL these questions, and more will be explored by those who need to know in the coming months.

We, at the Bad Art Muesum of Ohio look forward to serving you in the future.

Sincerely, and yours with deep appreciation of Bad Art,

The Director, BAMOO

The Bad Art Museum of Ohio is Charter Member of the American Federation of Bad Art Museums (AFBAM).